Laws In the US vs. Laws Outside of the US

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 Legal Cannabis Countries

Today, most of us are sure to relate when we say cannabis is highly politicized in almost every part of the world. Moreover, cultivating, possessing, consuming and distributing the herb comes with varying levels of consequence from location to location. Here's the thing: the global tide concerning this universal unifier is slowly turning — Many countries have passed decriminalization laws for small amounts of cannabis, and that's a pretty big deal. Only eight states allow for the use of recreational weed including Colorado, Washington, Alaska, California, Nevada, Oregon, Maine, Massachusetts, and the District of Columbia.

Did you know that there are other a number of other countries that have legalized both recreational and medicinal usage of the green plant? In this post, we are going to explore ten countries where the use and possession cannabis is decriminalized and also see how their laws differ from here in the United States. Let's dive on in!

1. The Netherlands

One of the countries where tourists flock from all over the world to enjoy a joint or two is The Netherlands. We've all head of Amsterdam right? Well it is a glorious place where anyone above the age of 18 can buy cannabis and cannabis products.  They can then head on over to one of the many designated coffee shops to smoke or use the sticky green stuff.  For the most part, it's legal to carry up to five grams for personal use.

Note: It's not entirely legal to smoke pot in Amsterdam, but it's tolerated.

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2. Uruguay

Uruguay is the first country in history to legalize cannabis on a national level. #TeamUruguay The plant was legalized in 2014, and soon after, it became completely legal to grow, sell and consume cannabis. It's important to note that only drug stores are permitted to sell the sticky icky to adult Uruguayans which are registered by the government. Moreover, registered smokers can organize smoking clubs where up to 15 to 45 people can grow cannabis with other enthusiasts — awesome right?

3. Canada

Canada has had medicinal marijuana legalized since 2001 — it happens to be another one of the first countries to legalize the plant. It's important to note that Canada is still working on legalizing recreational marijuana. In fact, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is working to legalize cannabis across all Canada — this is great news for Canadians.  YAY! 

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4. Spain

The cannabis laws in Spain are a bit complicated and fuzzy. It's actually legal to grow and consume the plants, but it has to be done privately. In other words, growing the plants for personal use is allowed and excluded from criminal prosecution. The best part? Spain boasts up to 700 private cannabis clubs — just apply for membership, and you're good to get high! It's important to note that buying and selling marijuana in any quantity is illegal and consuming it in a public place will land you a hefty fine.

5. Czech Republic

The Czech Republic is yet another country where the usage of cannabis comes with flexible conditions. For the most part, medical cannabis is legal in the country, and an individual may carry up to 15 grams for personal use. You should also know that production and selling of the drug are illegal and possession of large quantities above 15 grams is seen as a crime.

6. Germany

Pot lovers can legally consume the drug in Germany for both medical and recreational use. Moreover, you can get your marijuana cost covered by medical insurance and get your prescription at a pharmacy. It's however important to note that you can still be fined as a recreational user, but the good thing is, the act itself doesn't attract criminal prosecution.

7. Colombia

Growing cannabis in small quantities in the South American Country is legal, but smoking in public is considered illegal. Since 2012, the country decriminalized the possession of up to 20 grams of cannabis — so you can freely grow it for personal use. You should also know that the sale and transportation of weed in Colombia is illegal — just stick to growing the recommended quantity to be on the safe side of the law.

8. North Korea

As surprising as it sounds, North Korea is the only country in the world where it's completely legal to possess and consume marijuana in any quantity or form. The country doesn't even see it as a drug. Remember, North Korea is not the friendliest nation in the world, so we suggest you think twice before heading to the country stoned!

9. Costa Rica

The use and possession of cannabis have since been decriminalized in Costa Rica, but its cultivation is prohibited. For the most part, Costa Rica doesn't treat illegal drugs as a crime; they rather find it to be a public health matter. So what does this mean? Well, it simply implies that Costa Rica's national police force is unlikely to arrest anyone for smoking in public. However, they might fine you for smoking in a restaurant or bus stop — in other words, no smoking in common public areas.

10. Switzerland

Finally, it's legal to grow marijuana in Switzerland as long as it's meant for personal consumption. In other words, adults are free to grow and use cannabis on private property. It's important to note that buying or selling of the drug is seen as a criminal offense which is punishable by a fine.

And that's it! These are ten countries where you can legally get stoned as long as you do it according to the laws of the land. There are still other countries that should be a part of this list including Portugal which happens to be the first country to legalize all drugs including cannabis. Marijuana is also legal in Peru, Argentina, Australia, Russia, Jamaica and more! The global tide for cannabis is truly turning and we wouldn't have it any other way!

What do you think about these countries and their cannabis laws? Do you think their laws are better than ours in the US? Let us know your thoughts in the comments!

 

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